On The Glacier!

We have now been on Taylor Glacier for a week. Our put-in to the glacier, like the rest of these expeditions, was a somewhat strange combination of the careful plan we made for it, and fairly sudden last-minute changes. The plan this season was to send Kathy (our camp coordinator) and Michael (who knew where all the structures were to be placed) in as our advance guard. On the same day, a 5-person construction crew (“carps”) as well as 2 field support personnel (“BFC”) would go in to start erecting the structures and setting up camp. On the second day, Sarah, Berni and Jayred would fly to the glacier to get ready for drilling at a downglacier location. On the third day, the rest of our team (Ed, Joe, Andy, Peter and me) would arrive. This staggered put-in would allow for much of the camp to be set up without over-crowding.

The clever plan was off to a good start. With good weather, helicopter operations (“helo ops”) were on schedule and our advance guard, carps and BFC folks were off to the glacier by early afternoon on the 1st day. That evening, we heard that a storm system may be moving in to the McMurdo area. The official forecast issued the following morning called for slightly higher winds and more clouds, but nothing too ominous. We decided to err on the side of caution, and asked helo ops if it was possible to get all of the team to the glacier that day rather than waiting for the 3rd day. Bad weather was on our side, as several field research sites around McMurdo already had poor visibility and helicopter cancellations. So helo ops had unexpected openings in the schedule and said yes to not only getting all of our team out to the glacier early, but also flying out more of our science cargo on a faster schedule. We scrambled to get ready, and off we went to Taylor Glacier, arriving at 9 pm. This turned out to be a very good decision, as bad weather indeed moved in to McMurdo, and helo ops were completely shut down for the following 2 days.

Terminus of Taylor Glacier as seen from the helicopter. Photo by Peter Neff.

Terminus of Taylor Glacier as seen from the helicopter. Photo by Peter Neff.

The glacier greeted us with high winds this year. When we arrived, it was blowing between 20 – 30 mph, and putting up a tent was a 4-person job. The winds picked up further in the next 2 days, mainly staying around 30 – 40 mph but gusting up to 50. While we have experienced such winds on Taylor Glacier several times before, this was the windiest put-in we had, making the process of setting up and organizing much slower. Everything had to be secured and anchored to the ice at all times. We’ve had crates as heavy as 400 lbs slide on the ice before, so we were taking no chances. Over the course of the first two days, the wind shredded two of the construction crew’s tents, forcing them to move into one of the larger tent structures we had erected for storage.

Moving science cargo out of the helicopter landing zone. A cloud of blowing snow can be seen upglacier. Photo by Vas Petrenko.

Moving science cargo out of the helicopter landing zone. A cloud of blowing snow can be seen upglacier. Photo by Vas Petrenko.

Unpacking the large-volume ice melter and gas extraction device. Photo by Peter Neff.

Unpacking the large-volume ice melter and gas extraction device. Photo by Peter Neff.

 

Despite the high winds, the camp came together nicely and the construction crew and field support folks returned to McMurdo once helo ops resumed flying. We’re feeling a bit tired from fighting the high winds at put-in, but excited to start on the science. We already have our first ice cores! These date to about 130 thousand years, which is the timing of the next-to-last global deglaciation. Stay tuned for more updates.

Getting up in the morning. Photo by Vas Petrenko.

Getting up in the morning. Photo by Vas Petrenko.

Vas

Advertisements

One thought on “On The Glacier!

  1. COOL is what you can always say! Windy! No mom junk blowing around Taylor Glacier! Hope you get some stuff from mom to share though. 💂👹two warm guys!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s